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2016 Calendar

 

 

At the University of Colorado BioFrontiers Institute, researchers from the life sciences, physical sciences, computer sciences and engineering are working together to uncover new knowledge at the frontiers of science, and partnering with industry to make their discoveries relevant. The BioFrontiers Institute is uniquely defined both by our excellent faculty, research and leadership, and by the cross disciplinary opportunities that empower the work of our research community. Led by Nobel Laureate Tom Cech, and Chief Scientific Officer Leslie Leinwand, the BioFrontiers Institute integrates ten academic departments, and is housed in the state-of-the-art Jennie Smoly Caruthers Biotechnology Building.

The Advanced Light Microscopy Core meets the advanced imaging needs and demands for today's scientists. Cutting edge imaging technologies allow our researchers to advance biological discovery leading to research triumphs, while working alongside the many scientific disciplines within the BioFrontiers Institute, in an effort to improve human health and longevity.

The BioFrontiers Institute's CU Up Close Image Competition celebrates the art in science within the world of microscopy. This competition, in its inaugural year, was open to all individuals who have utilized the Advanced Light Microscopy Core facilities. Please contact Joe Dragavon (joseph.dragavon@colorado.edu) if you have any questions concerning the CU Up Close Image Competition or the images found below.

 

Cover

Katie Heiser, Garcea lab, BioFrontiers Institute

Nikon Spinning Disc Confocal

Microtubules are tubular aggregates of protein that are involved in a number of cellular processes. Here, the microtubules of a mouse fibroblast are colored according to their location within this 3D image, with the nucleus shown in grey. The ability to observe such fine structures in 3D allows researchers to image nearly every facet of the cell, leading to a myriad of discoveries.

 

January

Eric Bunker, Liu Lab, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Nikon Spinning Disc Confocal

Live-cell microscopy allows us to monitor cell division as it relates to wound healing in skin cells. Using this technology, researchers can observe parameters such as a cell growth regulator (red), a membrane-bound sensor for cell communication (green), and the nucleus of each cell (blue). Observing these parameters can increase our understanding of cell division under normal and cancerous conditions, leading to the identification of novel cancer-specific targets for drug development.

 

February

Mike Minson, Palmer Lab, BioFrontiers Institute

Nikon Ti-E Widefield

The cells in this image have been infected with the bacteria Salmonella (in red), with some proteins secreted by the invasive bacteria shown in green. The nucleus of each host cell is in blue. Witnessing how bacteria are spreading allows us to directly observe a specific physiological response to the bacteria, and helps to identify new antibacterial targets for drug treatment.

 

March

Dilara Batan, Palmer Lab, BioFrontiers Institute

Nikon Ti-E Widefield

This image shows individual Listeria bacteria in green and the cellular cytoskeleton of host cells in red. As the initial invasive bacterium gains a foothold within a host cell and multiplies, its daughter cells can escape the host cell and infect neighboring cells. The direct observation of the spread of bacteria can lead to the discovery of new treatments for bacterial infections.

 

April

Lynn Sanford, Palmer Lab, BioFrontiers Institute

Nikon A1R Laser Scanning Confocal

The hippocampus of the brain serves as the center for our emotions, memory, and the autonomic nervous system. Here, a hippocampal neuron has been genetically modified to report the local concentration of zinc, a tool that can provide insight into its function under normal and stressed conditions. In this image, the brighter colors indicate a higher zinc concentration. A deeper understanding of these functions can help medical professionals ensure the proper chemical balance within our neurons.

 

May

Esther Choi, Leinwand Lab, BioFrontiers Institute

Nikon A1R Laser Scanning Confocal

Here, we see the heart muscle cells of a neonatal rat; its cellular components are broken down and color-coded. The individual cellular units which allow for the contraction and beating of the heart are shown in red, and the nuclei in blue. Images such as this help researchers in the quest to prevent or correct genetic defects.

 

June

Massimo Buvoli and Chicca Buvoli, Leinwand Lab, BioFrontiers Institute

Nikon Spinning Disc Confocal

In this image, bundles of myosin filaments (in green and red) and their chaperone protein (blue) are shown. Myosins are the motor proteins that power muscle contraction. The study of myosin filament assembly can provide powerful insights into the treatment of defects in heart and skeletal muscle.

 

July

Dani Konetski, Bowman Lab,, Chemistry and Biochemistry

Nikon A1R Laser Scanning Confocal

A vesicle is fundamentally similar to a cell membrane and can be created synthetically, making this an ideal model structure for laboratory research. Because of its similarity to a cell membrane, vesicles have numerous applications include drug delivery and membrane studies. In this image, an aggregation of chemical-induced vesicles is shown.

 

August

Christa Trexlar, Leinwand Lab, BioFrontiers Institute

Nikon A1R Laser Scanning Confocal

Here, the presence of estrogen (green) within the nuclei (blue) of adult rat heart muscle cells are shown. Estrogen has been shown to be a critical component of cardiac health and disease. Identification and further research of estrogen's role in maintaining cardiac health may lead to the development of treatments for a variety of cardiac diseases.

 

September

Eric Kramer, Rentschler Lab, Mechanical Engineering

Nikon Ti-E Widefield

This image allowed us to observe the changes in collagen (the primary support structure for our arteries) once a specific medical device has been used to seal an artery. Researchers observed the effectiveness and efficiency of the tool by color-coding the native pre-procedure collagen (colored) and the denatured post-procedure collagen (transparent), which may ultimately help in the development of minimally invasive medical devices.

 

October  3rd Place

Anouk Killaars, Anseth Lab, BioFrontiers Institute

Nikon A1R Laser Scanning Confocal

Stem cells can become many different types of cells that are found within our bodies. In the lab, the material that they are grown on can direct the cell transformation. In this image, the interaction of the cell and the material are shown in green, the nucleus is blue, and the sub-cellular filaments are red. Research such as this may lead to enormous gains in personalized medicine.

 

November  2nd Place

Megan Schroeder, Anseth Lab, BioFrontiers Institute

Nikon Spinning Disc Confocal

At the cellular level, heart disease of the aortic valve can be characterized by the presence of cellular stiffness and stress fibers. This can be induced and observed in the lab, allowing researchers to gain an increased understanding of heart disease. Cells grown on a stiff matrix to induce the production of stress fibers are shown in this image under two different color sets. Warm tones: Nuclei (blue), Stress fibers (red), Normal fibers (green); Cool tones: Nuclei (green), Stress fibers (blue), Normal fibers (magenta).

 

December  1st Place

Katie Heiser, Garcea lab, BioFrontiers Institute

Nikon Spinning Disc Confocal

Microtubules are tubular aggregates of protein that are involved in a number of cellular processes. Here, the microtubules of a mouse fibroblast are colored according to their location within this 3D image, with the nucleus shown in grey. The ability to observe such fine structures in 3D allows researchers to image nearly every facet of the cell, leading to a myriad of discoveries.

 

Video 1st Place

Dani Konetski, Bowman lab

Nikon Laser Scanning Confocal

Please find the 1st Place Video here.

A vesicle is fundamentally similar to a cell membrane and can be created synthetically, making this an ideal model structure for laboratory research. Because of its similarity to a cell membrane, vesicles have numerous applications include drug delivery and membrane studies. In this video, the direct observation of light-induced vesicle formation is shown.

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